Articles from Dillon Tribune       1881              Dillon, Montana
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1881 APRIL 16

    William Thompson’s advertisement appears and features lumber. Lath, shingles and all kinds of planed lumber.  Locations for the goods are Camp Creek and Glendale.



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1881 APRIL 23

ODD FELLOWS
Anniversary Celebration
    All sojourning Odd Fellows in good standing are respectfully  invited to attend the 62nd anniversary celebration of the I.O.O.F., to be given by the members of Bannack Lodge No. 3, at Glendale, M.T., April 26th, 1881.  Procession will start at 1 o’clock sharp.  Music by  Glendale Independent Coronet Band.  Hon. W.O. Spear, of Butte City, will deliver an oration, after the procession at Metlin’s Hall.
    A Grand Ball will be given in the evening under the auspices of the Order Music by McIntyre’s String band.
    Supper at the Avery House.
  • Executive Committee, J.C. Metlin, Thos. Martin, H.J. Hoppy.
  • Invitation Committee, Glendale - Thos. H. Rutter, B.F. Mahan, J.M. Kellogg, Bannack - A.F. Wright, Lion City - John Graham.
  • Reception Committee - Bert Storr, Phillip Grotevant.
  • Floor Committee - H.T. Mahan, J.B. Losee.

    Tickets, including
 supper, $4.00


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1881 MAY 07

Charles Schlesinger’s
General
Supply Store
At
Dillon, Montana

Wholesale & Retail Dealer in
  • Wines
  • Liquors
  • Tobacco and
  • Cigars

Also:
Staple and Fancy Groceries, Tin,Glass,Wood and Willow Ware, Boots,Shoes,Clothing and Gents; Furnishing Goods
Branch House at CampCreek, M.T.




arbour
from Dillon Tribune,
photo courtesy of Ken Goody



1881 MAY 14


    It is rumored that Barney Marshal, of Glendale, has purchased the billiard hall and saloon of Alex Scott of Sheridan, and that Mr. Scott will engage in the mercantile business with R.P. Bateman at Sheridan.




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1881 JUNE 25

    Mr. Geo. Peck came up from Melrose Tuesday and reports that town rapidly building up, and that the present prospects of a live mining camp there - as well as a railroad town - is quite favorable.  The question of erecting extensive smelters is being agitated, for the purpose of working McCarty Mountain ores.
    We would ask those of our subscribers who are going to Melrose from this place to inform us of the fact and we will change the address at once.  It will be of great convenience to our carrier boy to know who has changed their place of residence.  We hope our subscribers will give prompt attention to this matter and thus same us time and trouble.



1881 JULY 02

    Frisco, foot racer, will run a foot race at Melrose on the Fourth of July for $100 a side, providing his opponent does not withdraw from the ring.  We bet on Frisco.

Train in Melrose, Montana
  
 The passenger trains commenced running to Melrose last Saturday evening.  The trains arrive here from the south at the usual time, and stop about one hour for supper.  The make the distance from here to Melrose in about 2 hours, arriving there at 9 o’clock p.m.  The train also stops here for breakfast.

    Blancett and Howell run the boss restaurant at Melrose.  The establishment is simply complete, from the dining room with its score of tables and waiters, to the kitchen with its celebrated cooks.  Connected with the dining room is a fruit and vegetable store, where the Hottentot or Esquimaux may enjoy his favorite dish.



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 Editor Tribune: 
   
   Leaving Dillon on the 24th ult., at 8 o’clock p.m., on the construction train, we soon realized the fact that we were spinning down the Beaver Head valley at a rapid gait toward the new terminus town of Melrose.  On traveling a few miles, we struck the grade going up to Birch Creek, and having an unusual big load of ties, freight, and passengers, it was very difficult for our engine to make the top of the grade, then we began going down grade all the way into
Melrose.




    <>Coming to the Big Hole bridge, which is one of the largest bridges on the road, and spanning the great Big Hole river, we began curving around the mountains until leaving Joe Brown’s and there we take almost a straight bee line for Melrose.  Arriving here at 10 o’clock p.m., all was hustle and bustle, some looking for trunks, some looking for - well, they did not know themselves they were so excited, while your correspondent was looking out for himself, waiting for a chance to steal a ride on the coach, but upon inquiry, I found both stages filled to their utmost capacity, with seven trunks and a pair of shafts to decorate the top deck, so I concluded it wouldn’t do to steal a ride as it was a little higher than I wished to ride, so I concluded to postpone my stage ride until I could find a small load going out, but I am no better off, nor any further than I was the first night.  Melrose is situated in a very pleasant valley, and within a stone throw of the magnificent banks of the great Big Hole river, and surrounded by mountains, and within ten minutes walk to Beaver Head and Madison  counties.  Melrose is five miles from Glendale and has a good wagon road leading to that city.  Five miles from Melrose is the Soapstone gulch where the Hecla Co. haul their ore from through Melrose to Glendale.  Several very nice buildings are going up every day.  Among our business men are Joe Keppler, Pond & Urlin, Gilg & Hoppe, B.M. DuRell & Co., of Glendale.  E.M. Ratcliff, C.L. Thomsen, L. Eliel, Chas. Schlesinger, Blanchett & Howell, and Baldwin & Sweet of Dillon.  There are a score of other building store rooms and will be ready for business in three or four days then Melrose will have the appearance of a flourishing little city.  Saturday night being the first night for passenger trains, we were treated with some choice selections of music by the Glendale Silver Coronet Band, which was a credit both to Glendale and to the young men that composed the band.  About 100 of the Glendale citizens greeted the train with shouts of welcome as it came thundering into our city. 

More anon.




    We would ask those of our subscribers who are going to Melrose from this place to inform us of the fact and we will change the address at once.  It will be of great convenience to our carrier boy to know who has changed their place of residence.  We hope our subscribers will give prompt attention to this matter and thus same us time and trouble.



1881 AUGUST 27

    Jess Jessrang, an escaped prisoner from the Deer Lodge Penitentiary, is captured at Willis by Sheriff Reinhardt and returned to his old quarters.

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1881 SEPEMBER 03

Notice of Dissolution

    Whereas, my late partner of the firm of Blancett & Howell, doing business at Melrose, Montana, under the firm name of Blancett & Howell, unaccountably disappeared some two weeks ago and has not reported his whereabouts, this therefore is to give notice that said partnership is dissolved and I will not be responsible for any debts contracted by him.  The Fruit and Restaurant business will be carried on the old stand in Melrose by myself alone. 
Sept. 1st, 1881.  
                 
 H.S. Blancett.



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1881 DECEMBER 03


    Glendale has a complete working health organization and deserves great credit for the promptness displayed in preventing the spread of small pox.
    Mr. George Stager of Glendale has the small pox, which he contracted at Wunderlich’s.  He was promptly removed to the pest house as soon as the nature of his malady was ascertained.
    Mr. C.W. Turner, of the Banking house of N. Armstrong & Co., Glendale, was in town this week.  Mr. Turner speaks very favorably of the future mining prospects of Glendale and adjoining camps.
    We learn from Mr. H.J. Hoppy, of Glendale, that the citizens of that town have raised a fund and purchased buildings about a mile from town, and established a pest house, for the small pox.  The house already has one inmate.
    We learn from the Ogden Pilot that Z.A. Poitras, of Glendale, died at the Chamberlain House, Ogden, Sunday morning and was buried Monday by the Odd Fellows of that city.  He arrived there on the 23rd instant suffering from consumption, and taking cold rapidly grew worse.  He wife was with him during his last moments.

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1881 DECEMBER 10

WANTED
 Mule Drivers!
  To good men we can give steady work for the winter.  Good wages, good grub and good quarters. 
Apply to Murphy, Neel and Co. or to the Hecla Con. Mining Co.,
Glendale, Montana.



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1881 DECEMBER 17

    At the meeting of the County Commissioners last, R.Z. Thomas, of Glendale, was appointed Justice of the Peace.

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1881 DECEMBER 24

    Minnie Stager of Glendale died on the 18th of small pox.  Her mother and brother are reported sick of the same disease.  The father, George Stager, has entirely recovered.

    We learn from Mr. A.H. Foster who was in from Glendale last week, that the public school at that place, which was closed on account of the small pox scare some time ago, was opened again last Monday.

    The newly appointed Post master of Glendale was in town during the week, partly on business connected with the post office.  We congratulate the people of Glendale on the new appointment, and believe they will have little cause for complaint regarding the mails.





    We would ask those of our subscribers who are going to Melrose from this place to inform us of the fact and we will change the address at once.  It will be of great convenience to our carrier boy to know who has changed their place of residence.  We hope our subscribers will give prompt attention to this matter and thus same us time and trouble.


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